ICYMI: Toledo Blade: How a Senate race turned around

“Mr. Ryan, on the other hand, has run as a Democratic populist who ties his rhetoric to policy. And he has run, apparently, as his true self — passionate, aggressive, and neither effete nor elitist…”

In case you missed it, a new column from the Toledo Blade’s Keith Burris illustrates how, with mere weeks to go until the midterm elections, Tim Ryan has deflated previous assumptions that San Francisco fraud J.D. Vance would easily run away with the U.S. Senate race in Ohio. Burris praises Tim’s campaign as ‘refreshing to watch,’ particularly in light of Vance’s glaring absence from the campaign trail. 

On the rare occasion that Vance does appear in public, he only embarrasses himself further — underscoring why national Republicans are panic-spending upwards of $30 million to bail him out — like this weekend, when he held a rally with former President Donald Trump at the exact same time as the Ohio State-Toledo game, only to be unrelentingly humiliated by Trump, who said, “J.D. is kissing my ass he wants my support so bad.” As Burris notes, “there is no reason to think [Vance] would return to being his own man in the Senate.”

Read more about why Tim’s robust campaign and Vance’s ‘candidate quality’ problems have made this one of the most competitive races in the country.

Read highlights from the Toledo Blade

  • What most of us anticipated is that the Republican nominee, whoever it turned out to be, would have an easy time of it.
  • But [Vance] decided not to run as a writer, thinker, or independent Republican. He decided to reinvent himself as a Trumper and run as that.
  • Moreover, he turned out to be a stiff on the campaign trail, as well as a Trump apologist and sycophant.
  • He doesn’t campaign much. And he does not think quickly or clearly on his feet.
  • In politics, experience helps enormously. Running for office when you have never done it before, especially high office, is not like taking over as head of Target when you used to be an investment banker.
  • Mr. Ryan, on the other hand, has run as a Democratic populist who ties his rhetoric to policy. And he has run, apparently, as his true self — passionate, aggressive, and neither effete nor elitist. It’s been refreshing to watch.
  • Mr. Vance has been painful to watch. The new persona fits him like a cheap suit. And there is no reason to think he would return to being his own man in the Senate.
  • “Mr. Vance is a venture capitalist tethered to a party that says wealth will trickle down and there is no right to privacy.”
  • Mr. Ryan is tied to a party that has created millions of jobs in the last two years, cut child poverty in half, and is rebuilding infrastructure. He wins the populist mantle on points as well as style.
  • This race, and most the Senate races this year, come down to Politics 101:
  • The ability of a candidate, as a candidate, matters — his, or her, ability to organize, communicate, fund-raise, and inspire.
  • Choosing ideology and loyalty over ability, substance, and experience will inevitably have a consequence.